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The ruins of the basilica in Kourion. In December one can have nice afternoon light quite early.
There are three major sites with ancient ruins in Cyprus: Paphos, Kourion and Salamis. I think that the best are in Paphos but it was too far from Ayia Napa (180 km) to go there and to visit - the days are too short and December. So we visited only Kourion and Salamis. The both sites are similar. Maybe I preferred Salamis because it was less "civilised" In Kourion there are roofs to cover excavations and big reflectors in the theater.

The archaeological remains of Kourion - which was one of the island’s most important city-kingdoms in antiquity - are of the most impressive on the island, and excavations have unearthed many significant finds, which can be viewed at the site.

The city-kingdom was built on the hills of the area, and overlooked and controlled the fertile valley of the river Kouris. According to archaeological finds, evidence suggests that Kourion was associated with the Greek legend of Argos of Peloponnese, and that its inhabitants believed they were descendents of Argean immigrants. The once-flourishing kingdom was eventually destroyed in a severe earthquake in 365 AD.

The magnificent Greco-Roman theatre - the site’s centrepiece - was built in the 2nd century BC and extended in the 2nd century AD. The theatre has been restored, and is now used for open-air musical and theatrical performances - mainly during the summer months - making it one of the most popular settings for high-calibre cultural events.
The remains of the Roman Agora are also visible at the site. The structure dates back to the early 3rd century, with additions made later on, during the Early Christian period. The Roman Agora is built on the remains of an earlier public building, which was in use from the end of the 4th century to the end of Hellenistic period.

The Agora of the city is surrounded by porticos with marble columns on both sides, whilst on its northwest side, is an impressive public bath and a small temple, the Nymphaeum, dedicated to the water nymphs.

An early Christian basilica at the site dates back to the 5th century, with separate baptistery on the external northern side.

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Lidka, danos, Fis2, snunney, holmertz, ChrisJ, jhm, Royaldevon, ikeharel, PaulVDV, mcmtanyel has marked this note useful

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Additional Photos by Malgorzata Kopczynska (emka) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 11575 W: 123 N: 29428] (138724)
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