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  #1  
Old 01-29-2007, 11:45 AM
braveone braveone is offline
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Default some background?

hey
is there anybody who knows a good website or book or something to get to know something more about the technical features of photography? Because POV, DOF... if I'm honest: I really don't know what you are talking about. I'm just a beginner and I would really like to learn a little bit more about those things...
Thanks a lot!
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  #2  
Old 01-29-2007, 12:03 PM
Keitht Keitht is offline
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Default Re: some background?

Have a look here http://www.luminous-landscape.com/ Lots of information and tutorials.
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Old 01-29-2007, 12:54 PM
lennarts lennarts is offline
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Default Re: some background?

I think it would be uselful to have a "glossary" for new users here in TE
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  #4  
Old 01-29-2007, 01:16 PM
Keitht Keitht is offline
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Default Re: some background?

There is the beginnings of one here http://www.trekearth.com/glossary.php. I'm sure Adam would be open to additional information for inclusion.
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  #5  
Old 01-29-2007, 01:23 PM
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Didi Didi is offline
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Default Re: some background?

+Before Internet I went into ly town library and I found many titles books about photography and I learnt by myself.
I can't help you for the title because I read French only.
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  #6  
Old 01-30-2007, 01:45 AM
danielswalsh danielswalsh is offline
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Default Re: (to braveone) some definitions....

Here's some definitions for you... let me know if there are others you are looking for...

DOF

DOF means depth of field. This jargon just means the area that is in sharp focus. For instance, if you focus on something 1m away, and your DOF is .3m, then everything from .9m to 1.2m is in sharp focus. (As a general rule, DOF is 1/3 in front of the point of focus, and 2/3 behind it.) An object in the image would be increasingly out of focus the farther it is outside the DOF.
DOF is determined by a combination of focal length and aperature. Longer focal lengths have naturally smaller DOF for a given aperature. DOF can always be increased by using a smaller aperature opening (larger f/ number).
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POV

POV means point of view. The angle in which the photo was taken (ie: low POV meaning close to the ground etc.)
In the context of vision and visual perception, is the way in which objects appear to the eye based on their spatial attributes, or their dimensions and the position of the eye relative to the objects.
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Bokeh

Bokeh is directly related to depth of field, but the nature, and limits of application, of this direct relationship are not necessarily obvious.

For lenses of differing lengths photographing the same scene at the same aperture, if the subject is made the same apparent size, technically the depth-of-field will be the same. However, assuming the camera is all that moves to alter the apparent subject size, the longer lens will have less distracting detail in the background, i.e., a subjectively greater degree of bokeh, because the long lens has a narrow field of view—meaning that a smaller portion of the background will be in view behind the subject.

A shorter lens will show a wider angle of view of the background, so even though the details individually have the same degree of blurring, there are typically many more such details filling the same area of the image, and the eye will perceive this as "more detail". If the background has almost no detailed features, it would be hard to notice the difference in either regard.
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Regards,
- Dan

*thanks to Adams glossary section for DOF, and Wikipedia for the rest.
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